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20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
in people suffering from obesity and diabetes. john: decreasing. >> moving in tt direction. to mcdonald's and burger king and others are more responsible. john: a real study has been done on this. you can say, it doesn't cost that much to p up a little entellus with a calorie count is. and why you did a test. they went into fast food places that the law went into effect. oh, yes. great that we can see the calorie count and they're paying more attention. indelicate the receipts and saw that they were eating more calories. >> well, let me just say that the best thing that we can do is step get the consumer the choice, th option. john: wrote a book titled everything i want to do is illegal. [laughter] >> right. [applause] de. john: what is your point? >> my point is that every time the government penetrates into the food system the abuses mount up from the big guys and little guys like us get routed back from the table do to a smothering bunch of regulations. vernment interventions come at the result of wind things it out of control. i health care costs to go $150 billion. john: it's his b
at the diseases that they can prevent like diabetes i think i would much rather run the risk of the little upset stomach if it meant decreasing heart disease and diabetes. this is absolutely not a reason. you should not be eating more bacon cheeseburgers as a result. it may be safer than we think, but not from an overall health standpoint. charles: i have to tell you that you look really good, scott. you eat this stuff all the time? >> i have a well-balanced diet. very well balanced and nothing complements this like a nice big bacon cheeseburger. >> do you think that the police have gone overboard and that this is all part of a bigger agenda of the nanny state and not necessarily anything to do with health? >> well, just like our other guest said, there's no reason to stop eating vegetables. it's about a well-balanced diet. you need to add protein and leafy greens. myself included. asparagus or whatever, it's all about variety and having a well-balanced diet. >> we know that part. but wht about the idea that perhaps meat is safer than we have been told? >> i cannot argue with that. i've eaten me
to think about the cancer program, diabetes program, there are lots of interesting drugs they're still not sure about and that is what makes a good investment. liz: we had the ceo of merck on from davos. he was very confident. every seo i've ever spoken to say it is a fact of life patents will expire at some point, we're working on a pipeline. could it outperform the best drugs? >> he really displayed a lot of sincerity in his passion taking to another level of innovation and that is why we liked it. right now we're at a place to hear more good news. they have gotten through in more recent generic threat for the respiratory product and they're looking forward, they knew it was coming for five to 10 years before we were all focused on what the earnings number would be. liz: what is the average number of drugs i in the pipeline you would like to see? some say that is a bit low for a pipeline. >> it is not about the number of drugs, it is about the potential. really what are you trying to feed, what is the sales pace they are losing for the expiration? what are they trying to create in th
. for example, we have a franchise in diabetes now. the leading drug, and it's a fabulous drug, controls blood sugar, but, again, it's differentiated from the prior generic drug because it does not cause weight gain, important to those on the medicine for a long time. >> one the diseases that affects our nation and costs so much the the cost of everything, people wonder about the drug cost structure. how do bring it down just a bit. does the affordable health care act do that in a way that you can also live with it? >> well, we had to give additional reacts to make the affordable care act work, and that's a tradeoff that's worth it. now more americans have access to really good health coverage so we'll take that tradeoff any day. >> you are part of the a panel here called smart regulation, and, in fact, it's one of the panels, there are not many, that you really understand the actual title. not so arcane and detail, but what is smart regulation? >> regulation at avoiding risk, but not so much that it impedes innovation. in our country, we had issues with the compounding of drugs and people got
: which leads to diabetes and all other problems. >> 10% of the healthcare costs in the united states. if we do not get a handle on obesity, we are never going to be able to control the cost. liz: last question, if you were to have one question you wish could be answered for you and the cleveland clinic this year, what would it be that would help you really run ahead with the cleveland clinic efforts? >> i think all of us are trying to understand, in the united states, what the new opportunities are in our organization of healthcare. we think that we clearly cannot just decrease the cost. we have to change the way we deliver healthcare. we have to know what the rules of the game are going to be so we can plan them. dennis: all right. thank you. that was a nice report. cheryl: when it comes to blockbuster these days, go big or go home. liz will sit down with imax ceo in the next hour. small business big ideas. it results from the chamber of commerce shows there remains a specific amount of concern. survey finds that 82% say the economy is on the wrong track. 71% feel the healthcare law
diabetes and you were told hey look if you fall down several times in the streets, that's what your care is supposed to provide. stuart: you are asking for massive increase on the spending of mental healthcare. yes, you are. come on. >> first of all, if you don't spend on this, you will be cleaning up lots of crime scenes later. stuart: you're definitely a republican? >> and secondly, you already know people will deluge the emergency rooms with they think they are having heart attacks -- they think they are having panic disorder. you cannot escape paying for this. you can do it smartly if you jump on it from the beginning. we have medicine -- stuart: you are talking up your own book. you're a mental health professional and you want more business. >> i have more business than i can handle but people pay me in cash. why do they pay me? because you can't get an insurer to pay for you to see a psychiatrist. stuart: we're out of time. what can i say? >> i tell my patients you can pay me now or pay me later. i would say the same thing on the floor of the united states congress. stuart: we will
individuals and insurance companies and employers, the cost of diabetes, cost of heart disease, cost of cardiovascular, it is the best investment you can make from roi point of view as being healthy. from our point of view we focus on that value message. tracy: you hope that is how people are thinking, right. >> right. tracy: at the end of the day if i pay a little bit now to take care of myself it helps the entire economy down the road with health care costs on the rise. >> big-time. tracy: you still have people wanting to show up at meetings? $4 billion industry, how do you differentiate yourself? >> we're completely different. which is, our approach is to give people a science-based program that has been demonstrated. we turned 50 this year. we know what we're doing. we have a science based program we launched new version of. by far the best one we ever had. comprehensively helps people get to consistently healthy lifestyle. we surround them with tools, apps, website, you name it, we got it. to help people get there and not just lose the weight but keep it off. >> are other system
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)